O'Reilly OSCON

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 David: Can you update with the current version?  Pwooster 18:58, 10 May 2007 (EDT)


Title: The Open Source Space Software Community

Session Information:

 Date: 07/27/2007
 Time: 11:35am to 12:20pm
 Presentation files are due on June 25th.
 (There is no paper associated with this talk, just a presentation.)

Presentation Outline:

Putting a very rough outline together to get things started.

- Introduction

- Why Open Source in Space?

- State of the Community

- Barriers to Adoption (Export Controls, Legal issues for Government Agencies...)

- What is NASA doing to address these challenges

- Case Study: FlightLinux

- Case Study: CosmosCode/Developspace

- How to get involved

- Questions?

Abstract:

Several of the internet's pioneers have recently become space exploration pioneers as well. Key players from Microsoft, PayPal, Amazon, id Software and the Ubuntu Foundation are now actively involved in various aspects of the space industry. It is not just these internet entrepreneurs who are bringing changes to the space community though. Free and open source software is increasingly being used by and created for various aspects of space exploration and research.

This talk will provide an overview of the current state of the open source space software community, including software released under NASA's open source NOSA license, and will also provide some thoughts about where the community is going from here. This talk will also discuss some of the legal issues, specifically export controls, that could possibly halt the spread of this movement. Because of the potential military applications of many aspects of peaceful space efforts, the open source space software community needs to be aware of issues relating to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and other regulations.

Brief Description:

Free and open source software is increasingly being used by and created for various aspects of space exploration and research. This talk will provide an overview of the current state of the open source space software community, including software released under NASA's open source NOSA license.